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600 Holley fuel line fitting repair

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600 Holley fuel line fitting repair

Postby Shopboss » Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:36 am

Does anybody know if there is a repair system out there to repair the striped out threads on the 600 side hung bowls? We build a lot of these carbs for a class where the rules restricts them to the side hung bowls.
I try to instruct the customers to be easy on them and if they see a leak to replace the gasket instead of trying to tighten the fitting but that doesn't seem to work. So I have a pot load of striped out float bowls. It seems like some one should make a 9/16 24 thread repair like the Time-Sert.
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Postby barnym17 » Mon Aug 24, 2009 3:33 pm

I have repaired a couple with epoxy, jb -weld to be exact it worked well and is still holding after several years.Just make sure it is very clean, coat the threads of the fitting and install finger tight, let set over night and good to go.Of course then you have to be careful not to strip the threads where the line goes in as this is a very permanent repair and probably can only be done once.
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Postby bmcdaniel » Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:40 pm

I've also used the JB Weld on inlet fittings a few times. Still holding up after many years.
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Postby Shopboss » Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:53 am

Thanks for the reply. I've also used JB. What I was really looking for was a permanent repair. These carbs are pulled of and on so many times over the racing season and also when we are dynoing that I was hoping someone made a steel insert like the Time-sert or even a Heli-coil. This is a very common problem with dirt track racers. They crank down on the Banjo fitting to try to stop a leak and strip them out. I have about 20 600 Holley laying around and have robbed the ft. bowls off of most of them. I have re-threaded the bowls to accept an AN fitting which works but the guys don't like having to changeover to this.
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Postby VMC » Wed Aug 26, 2009 11:10 am

This won't be any help in regards to the bowls that are already stripped, but you might consider abandoning the use of the banjo fittings and install a conventional 3/8" inverted flare fitting. Holley offers it under P/N 26-43.

http://www.jegs.com/i/Holley/510/26-43/10002/-1

Image

Not only will this stop the wear & tear on the bowl threads, it also eliminates the need for rubber fuel line.
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Postby bill jones » Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:16 pm

-I looked at one of those front bowls today---it looks like you just pull about the first 3/16" of an inch of the threads out of the bowl.

-the bowl is threaded at least .300" deeper--and can be threaded 9/16-24 even deeper by another .100" or so.

-If the problem was mine I'd machine up some new brass banjo fittings that are at least .300" longer and use the rest of the existing threads that are back there inside the bowl.

-or find some local machinest who's handy at that sort of thing and get him to make you 20 or 30 pieces or so if you can get the price right.

-The price of the repair or repair part can equal nearly the same price as a new bowl before it should become a cost factor.
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Postby Rick1999 » Thu Aug 27, 2009 5:39 pm

Epoxy or JB weld on a race car fuel inlet? A fuel bowl costs about $15, why would anyone risk burning their race car (or themselves) to the ground over that? Sure you may get into a jam at the racetrack but come on, if it's that common carry a spare.

I like the adapter so you can use AN fittings, but as far as fixing a damaged one, most shops would charge you more to fix the bowl than a new one costs.
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Postby Rick1999 » Thu Aug 27, 2009 5:41 pm

bill jones wrote:-I looked at one of those front bowls today---it looks like you just pull about the first 3/16" of an inch of the threads out of the bowl.

-the bowl is threaded at least .300" deeper--and can be threaded 9/16-24 even deeper by another .100" or so.

-If the problem was mine I'd machine up some new brass banjo fittings that are at least .300" longer and use the rest of the existing threads that are back there inside the bowl.

-or find some local machinest who's handy at that sort of thing and get him to make you 20 or 30 pieces or so if you can get the price right.

-The price of the repair or repair part can equal nearly the same price as a new bowl before it should become a cost factor.
I didn't completely read you reply before I posted mine or I wouldn't have bothered, you nailed it perfectly.
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Postby Shopboss » Thu Aug 27, 2009 7:12 pm

I agree with what Rick, Bill, And VCM pointed out. I have used the adapter and have even cut the bowl down to get to fresh threads. What I'm up against is heavy handed guys cranking down the banjo bolt and striping the treads. I can't understand why no one has come out with a repair such as the thread-sert for this problem like they have for a striped spark plug hole. This would be a quick,easy and dependable repair. I guess there just isn't enough of a demand for it.
It's unreal what some of these guys do to carbs. I had one in the shop last week that had been repaired (I use that term very loosely) The ft bowl screws had been striped out. It had long wood screw in it and a double bowl gasket. You could wiggle the bowl around.The guy couldn't figure out why the pump and shooter wouldn't work right. I have another that the throttle plates must have been loose. Someones repair was to mig weld all 4 of them in place.
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Postby ProPower engines » Fri Aug 28, 2009 1:30 am

I have seen thatproblem and what I do is weld an AN -6 fitting to the bowl.
It will alow the use of realfuel line couplings and they will not tear the threads out of the bowl again.
Or as mentioned before just supply the customer with a new bowl and kick his nads to remind him to be gentle.
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Postby Shopboss » Fri Aug 28, 2009 4:56 am

Thanks to all for the suggestions. I've also done the -6 thing. Even tried the kicking. Just got a broken foot and a busted nose for that one. :lol:
I guess I sound like a broken record but someone really needs to make a simple repair for this.... But then we need $1.00 a gallon Gas also.
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Postby bill jones » Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:31 am

-One problem with any insert is having to run it across right where the fuel cavity which would cover up that hole.

-you'd have have a really short insert only 3/16" long so that you didn't cover that hole---or a longer solid insert and then go in some way and make a fuel cavity hole thru insert.
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Postby Doug Schriefer » Fri Aug 28, 2009 1:06 pm

There is a company online that makes Banjo bolts in different lengths and sizes. Very common for pressure fittings.
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Postby bill jones » Fri Aug 28, 2009 3:10 pm

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