Garage shop building

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Ron C.
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Post by Ron C. » Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:25 pm

If your going to be running this shop off the residental house service that might be a problem. In your area probably most service is no more than 100 amp services. So a lot will depend on how far your from the transformer. You may run into a legal issue doing it also. Are you served by So Cal Edison?

As for 5 blade house fans, a 4 blade will move more air. They went to 5 blades for aesthetics, more appealing to the eye.

Also be on alert to light strobing with your 3 phase equipment.

When I built my shop everyone I talked too before building said, they wished they had built it bigger. So I built mine bigger than original planned. Didn't work, I should have built it biggggger!

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Keith Morganstein
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Post by Keith Morganstein » Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:29 am

SchmidtMotorWorks wrote:
My building is 12" block.
I haven't seen 12" block here, the standard block is 8 x 8 x 16. What are the other dimensions of the 12" block?
12x8x16

Concrete block can be dangerous in earthquake areas. Does local code call for specific construction methods when using concrete blocks?

You might consider Insulated Precast Concrete Panel Wall Construction.

Here is one example:

http://www.superiorwalls.com/

SchmidtMotorWorks
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Post by SchmidtMotorWorks » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:32 pm

Concrete block can be dangerous in earthquake areas. Does local code call for specific construction methods when using concrete blocks?
Yes, they require mortar and rebar fill.

Every contractor I talk to says I should use conventional stick framing and stucco like all the houses in the area. I just have concerns that it won't stop sound well enough.
http://www.schmidtmotorworks.com Aerospace Machine Work: Prototypes, Tooling, Molds.

defrag010
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Post by defrag010 » Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:42 pm

cpmotors wrote:Defrag010! How's school going?

No, just a 15. Circa 1954, rebuilt in '86. Picked it up a few years ago when I called one of the local rebuilders about grinding a Ford 3.8? crank, and they said no, we dont do that anymore, you wanna buy the grinder? I bought the grinder that year instead of valvetrain for my engine. :roll: Had it all apart and cleaned/painted,etc. Learned alot from reading your threads (crank grinder is pissing me off!) so I built this stroke gauge after screwing around with the first crank and was off .005" on the stroke. +/- .001" is not a problem now on stroke.

Image
That stroke gauge looks awesome! That machine looks like it's in nice shape too.

School's going good, I am done in June. I don't have enough $ down here to build anything so I'm just itching to find a job where I can produce some results. I've got some targets that I'm going to start dropping resume bombs on this summer (wesmar, kuntz, winberg, mile high crankshaft).
I called the place I used to work at this Jan to get my W2, and they said that they STILL haven't found a replacement for me yet. They are taking most of the work down the street to the other machine shop to get done and marking it up. Nobody there knows how to run any of the machines, and they are having hell finding a competent machinist with thick enough skin to put up with their bullshit. They said that if I graduate and can't find a job, they would take me back on doing the exact same thing I was for 22$ an hour (3.25$ more than I was making). I have thought about just offering them a buyout on all of their machines (storm 1165 cam grinder, berco rtm260 and storm 1648 crank grinder, cv616, rottler f2, sunnen ch-100, peterson 996, berco rsc850) and starting up a little home machine shop like you have, but that would take too big of a bank loan than I can get myself. :?

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Post by Cogburn » Tue Mar 03, 2009 4:03 pm

I were to build a new shop it would be an all steel truss building with steel on the inside also. I'd insulate with a infrared heat barrier and foam filling in the walls and ceiling.

RW TECH
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Post by RW TECH » Sun Mar 15, 2009 1:42 pm

SchmidtMotorWorks wrote:Yes, they require mortar and rebar fill.

Every contractor I talk to says I should use conventional stick framing and stucco like all the houses in the area. I just have concerns that it won't stop sound well enough.
Can you do anything with anechoic foam to reduce noise?

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Post by SchmidtMotorWorks » Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:31 am

Can you do anything with anechoic foam to reduce noise?
I have always seen that stuff on the inside face of walls, I wonder if it would work inside the walls.

I have been told the best way to block sound is to build double walls (inside-outside) that aren't connected.
http://www.schmidtmotorworks.com Aerospace Machine Work: Prototypes, Tooling, Molds.

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Post by Engguy » Fri Mar 27, 2009 2:57 am

SchmidtMotorWorks wrote:Do you have a link to the Siemens piece? I might be able to get a discount on it.

Yah Washington had some good points but it had changed a lot from how it was when I lived there in the 80's. I lived in King County, Mercer Island to be exact, that is about as nice of a place as you will find in Washington but more of a place for sailboats than racing engines.

Shop progress: Dug the yard up for concrete, someone is going to perfect the grading and put in the forms and footings this week. I hope to pour concrete in about two weeks.
I don't. I'll try to find more info, its going to take awhile.

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Re: Garage shop building

Post by rce4csh » Wed May 09, 2012 12:18 am

Steel buidling, sprayfoam insulation and liner panel on the inside. Still too noisy? Then use soundboard under silent rock drywall membrane to keep things really quiet!!! The new technologies that exist in quiet framed wall would be plenty enough to keep things really queit for you and your neighbors.

Block walls in Calfornia? Well unless you are going to incorporate some post tensioned anchoring like they do in the walls of the big box stores out there, you are barking up the wrong tree. Same goes for precast panels as they behave just like tilt panel construction in seismic events. Made a small fortune in 1994 doing epoxy injection inspection for damaged tilt panel and precast panel buildings after the Northridge Earthquake. The block construction was much easier, we just swept them up and rebuilt new ones using, you guessed it, post tensioned anchoring in the walls.

BTW. Block construction in California requires multiple bond beams within the wall. These bond beams are necessary to meet the seismic requirements there. Since bond beams essentially are sections of the block walls poured solid with grout, the noise transmission goes up on the exterior side of the wall from activities within the interior building envelope.

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Re: Garage shop building

Post by JoePorting » Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:20 am

SchmidtMotorWorks wrote:I am building a garage shop in Orange CA, if anyone has any words of wisdom regarding building permits, electrical work, phase converters, concrete work, I'm listening.
Have you gone in the City of Orange Planning Department to ask what they recommend? That might save you a lot of grief. They might even recommend you see some real estate attorney so you can get the good, bad, and ugly of each option. $300 an hour there might save you $300,000. Each city has their own weird regulations. Better to find out about them early.
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Sbc406vega
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Re: Garage shop building

Post by Sbc406vega » Sun Feb 15, 2015 12:20 am

Mount the compressor to a pallet, build it a doghouse enclose with a door around it, Throw on a sheet metal roof and toss it out back behind the shop DONE. Drill a hole for the pipe outlet to the inside with a ball valve shutoff and start your plumbing. Way easier that way not to mention pure silence.

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Re: Garage shop building

Post by Fingers » Fri Feb 27, 2015 6:07 am

Sbc406vega wrote:Mount the compressor to a pallet, build it a doghouse enclose with a door around it, Throw on a sheet metal roof and toss it out back behind the shop DONE. Drill a hole for the pipe outlet to the inside with a ball valve shutoff and start your plumbing. Way easier that way not to mention pure silence.
That's the go 100%
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Re: Garage shop building

Post by Dan Timberlake » Sun Mar 08, 2015 12:10 pm

One of these, somewhat oversized, does a remarkable job on inlet noise.
http://store.industrialairpower.com/110 ... 7AodszcAtg

The volume of the main chamber should be at least 10X the piston displacement.
Page 124 here-
http://www.bksv.com/doc/bn1299.pdf

Might even be useful for an out-of-shop installation to reduce the chance of p*ssed off neighbors

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