Floor drains??

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notagn
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Floor drains??

Post by notagn » Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:47 pm

It seams floor drains are always in the way or just in the wrong place. Where do you guys think the best place in a shop is? I am also wonder what kind of pipe to use under the concrete?

blockislandguy
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by blockislandguy » Tue Dec 24, 2013 8:14 pm

Let me suggest that you go slow on drains. What do you intend to drain? Are you on town sewers? I think a building inspector is going to have many questions about drains. (You do plan on having your new building meet all building codes and be inspected if only to ensure it is re-saleable, right?).

Keith Morganstein
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by Keith Morganstein » Sun Dec 29, 2013 6:08 am

blockislandguy wrote:Let me suggest that you go slow on drains. What do you intend to drain? Are you on town sewers? I think a building inspector is going to have many questions about drains. (You do plan on having your new building meet all building codes and be inspected if only to ensure it is re-saleable, right?).
Good advice, floor drains are big problem. The only thing legal around here (in a repair shop) is draining into a closed system for recycling, evaporating or having a licensed waste hauler pump and truck it away.

ProPower engines
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by ProPower engines » Tue Dec 31, 2013 11:31 pm

Keith Morganstein wrote:
blockislandguy wrote:Let me suggest that you go slow on drains. What do you intend to drain? Are you on town sewers? I think a building inspector is going to have many questions about drains. (You do plan on having your new building meet all building codes and be inspected if only to ensure it is re-saleable, right?).
Good advice, floor drains are big problem. The only thing legal around here (in a repair shop) is draining into a closed system for recycling, evaporating or having a licensed waste hauler pump and truck it away.

X3
Up here we have to have a big tampon deal in the collection box in the pipe exiting the property and they are only available from the local city work dept. For a 4" pipe its $275 and they are to last for 5years with just water passing through them.
Oil plugs them almost right away.
we pluged all the drains and had the floor covered during inspection so the inspectors would not even concider any sort of monitoring system.
We wash down in the jet washer or the hot tank directly before going to the rinse down area just to be sure.
Had my plug replaced a couple months ago and passed with flying colours. But some states have other camera monitoring systems in their draniage systems and can track a spill or dumping right to the source.

The best bet is teach you guys to not be slobs and spill oils and related fluids on the floor and keep a bale of absorbant pads for oil and coolant as well as kitty litter just in case.
That stuff can go to the land fill or other proper disposal areas.
Real Race Cars Don't Have Doors

racear2865
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by racear2865 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:38 pm

ProPower engines wrote:
Keith Morganstein wrote:
blockislandguy wrote:Let me suggest that you go slow on drains. What do you intend to drain? Are you on town sewers? I think a building inspector is going to have many questions about drains. (You do plan on having your new building meet all building codes and be inspected if only to ensure it is re-saleable, right?).
Good advice, floor drains are big problem. The only thing legal around here (in a repair shop) is draining into a closed system for recycling, evaporating or having a licensed waste hauler pump and truck it away.

X3
Up here we have to have a big tampon deal in the collection box in the pipe exiting the property and they are only available from the local city work dept. For a 4" pipe its $275 and they are to last for 5years with just water passing through them.
Oil plugs them almost right away.
we pluged all the drains and had the floor covered during inspection so the inspectors would not even concider any sort of monitoring system.
We wash down in the jet washer or the hot tank directly before going to the rinse down area just to be sure.
Had my plug replaced a couple months ago and passed with flying colours. But some states have other camera monitoring systems in their draniage systems and can track a spill or dumping right to the source.

The best bet is teach you guys to not be slobs and spill oils and related fluids on the floor and keep a bale of absorbant pads for oil and coolant as well as kitty litter just in case.
That stuff can go to the land fill or other proper disposal areas.
This past year I built another addition to my shop. The main building is a 50 x 100 and I did not install a drain. When I added the addition 50 x 50, my fellows said you have to add a drain. Has turned out to be a mess. Sloppiness is not the problem, it is accident. I finally dug a hole and placed a 55 gallon drum and made a closed system. When the drum gets full. I swap it out to another drum. I then take the full drum and evaporate the liquid out and pay disposal of the solid.
reed

ProPower engines
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by ProPower engines » Sun Jan 05, 2014 2:03 pm

Not sure what you mean by accident.
Every one has an accident when they spill stuff but some guys are just slobs and could spill anything regardless of the container.
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racear2865
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Re: Floor drains??

Post by racear2865 » Sun Jan 12, 2014 8:32 pm

ProPower engines wrote:Not sure what you mean by accident.
Every one has an accident when they spill stuff but some guys are just slobs and could spill anything regardless of the container.

Dave
The accident was a hydraulic hose bursted on the hydraulic unit of the crankshaft grinder. The operator left machine on long enough that it dumped 40 gallons of fluid. The hose bursting was a accident. Him leaving it on long enough to dump all the fluid was sloppiness and purely dumb or on purpose.
Take you pick, end result was the same, $24 a gallon oil out of my pocket, not his.
reed

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